Some of the most prominent equestrians in the world are women. This regal sport requires elegance, maturity, and discipline. More and more women are showing, riding, and jumping – and women are the backbone of equestrian teams. Veterinarians, teams, coaches, and show women are the future of this rigorous sport.

 

Women's Professional Rodeo Association

“The Women’s Professional Rodeo Association was formed in 1948 when thirty-eight cowgirls came together in San Angelo, Texas to create an organization dedicated to the promotion and advancement of women in the sport of rodeo. The earliest pioneers of the Girl’s Rodeo Association (GRA) were ropers, bronc riders, and barrel racers. They were fed up with a system which did not grant them competitive opportunities in the arena and, when it did, operated under unfair conditions. The GRA began with 74 original members with 60 approved contests and a total payout of $29,000. In 1981 the GRA changed its name to the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association. It is the oldest women’s sports association in the country and the only one governed entirely by women.
Today, the fast-paced event of barrel racing dominates the activities of most WPRA members. WPRA barrel racers compete for millions of dollars each year, culminating in twelve circuit finals rodeos held throughout the country, the Ram National Circuit Finals Rodeo held in Oklahoma City, OK in April, and the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo held in Las Vegas each December.”

Click here to learn more!

Gulf Coast Women's Equine Association

It is an organization for women who are over the age of 21 years old and who are genuinely interested in horses.

Click here to learn more!

 

 

Abingdon Foundation is not in partnership with any organization, website, or resource listed on these pages. Any links are simply information that may prove useful to the reader. Abingdon Foundation does not endorse any organization, person, party, or website unless explicitly stated. Blog posts are the opinion of the author and views expressed are not necessarily indicative of the views or practices of Abingdon Foundation.